Land of my Father: Parenti, Southern Italy

August and September, 2016

With origins dating back to the end of the 17th-century, Parenti is the land of my father. Rather like a village more than a small town in Calabria in Southern Italy, Parenti is nestled on the Valley of the beautiful Savuto River.

Parenti is famous for agriculture, especially wonderful potatoes and sparkling fresh mineral water, which is bottled nearby.

Italians believe that Parenti’s rich soil and fresh clean air makes for the best potatoes in Italy, and other great produce. I hear that the onions in Tropea are also renown throughout Italy, but I’m yet to try some.

At the end of the day, every region in Italy specialises in its own type of wonderful produce. Guess I’ll just have to eat my way around Italy!

Cosenza, train, Calabria, Italy

Leaving Cosenza – part of the Old Town on the right

Travel to Parenti

A rickety old train takes you from Cosenza Central station and climbs the hills until you reach Rogliano, which is a town of just over 6,000 residents.

A bus awaits the train to take you on a wild ride to Parenti.

Expect to swerve around the snakelike road at a fast pace (this is Italy), which weaves its way around the mountains through many switchbacks, until you arrive in one piece (hopefully) in Parenti.

A little side-note about the bus drivers here…

Drivers swing a normal-sized bus around these wild switchbacks as if driving a Ferrari. One hand turns the wheel whilst the other hand waves frantically in the air during a conversation with a passenger, or chatting on a mobile phone – simultaneously.

This all inclusive memorable experience that will leave your knuckles white and your nerves slightly shattered, comes at the bargain basement price of €4.60 return from Cosenza.

As the first visit to Parenti was in August (summer), a car hire was in excess of €100 for the day. Although I’m glad to have travelled by train and bus, just for the experience!

A direct bus does travel between Cosenza and Parenti but these are few and far between. Caught the direct bus back to Cosenza, which seemed quicker and we were the only 2 in the bus so like a taxi hire. (Your return ticket includes either mode of transport.)

Rogliano, Parenti, Calabria, Italy

Cool train to Rogliano

The village

Chestnut and Oak trees surround this pretty village sitting high in the hills at some 850 metres above sea level (depending on who is telling the story or what you read – it varies).

Apart from Parenti’s beautiful surrounds, its close proximity to the Sila National Park with a plateau stretching five-hundred-thousand hectares, should make this a tourist destination. Although to the contrary, this is a very sleepy village with a declining population of just over 2,000 residents.

memorial, Parenti, Calabria, Italy

Memorial to the fallen of WWI

As my father was from this village and emigrated to Australia in the 1950s, this is one of the reasons for visiting. I still have relatives in this town.

Another reason is to commence my Italian Citizenship process, which I had emailed the Commune in Parenti (administrative division providing many civil functions) in advance and on the advice of the Naples Immigration.


Scene from a movie

Arriving at about 12:10 hrs after the train and bus ride here, a coffee was beckoning but alas, everything was closed, streets were empty, and seemed just like a ghost town. Finding a tiny nondescript dark bar, we ventured in.

And venturing in was as if we were entering onto a set of an old Spaghetti Western movie…

Approaching the dark hazy bar, several men were standing and leaning over the bar, drinking beer.

Casually, each one looked up at us, then slowly filed away from the bar to drink outside.

The three elderly locals sitting at a table stopped sipping their Espressos and also started watching us curiously. Strangers in town.

Ordered our Espressos at the bar, which were made from a tiny Pod machine (the first I’ve had in Italy).

The friendly elderly owner, Barista, come barman, brought the thimble-sized plastic disposable cups on a dainty ceramic saucer, to our table.

Pacing the bar a couple of times before working up the courage, the barman wandered over again to chat with us. Starting to ask questions, it turns out that he knows my relatives in the village – no surprise. After all, it is a small place. So, after a friendly chat, we left and found somewhere to eat, as only crisps and chocolate bars are served here.

Totally hilarious!

The barman was friendly enough, but his sparkling bright blue and inquisitive eyes searched my face continuously. Perhaps as a stranger, I couldn’t be trusted? Think: “You ain’t from round these here parts are ya?”

Cafetteria Pasticceria Di Fuoco Angela (Via Salina N 168) – Closing at 13:00 hrs, not sure for how long and not sure of the re-opening time, we downed another very strong Espresso (€0.70) and scrumptious pastries (€0.60), in 15 minutes as the bar was closing. Lovely surrounds with an outdoor seating area. Great service (as usual in Italy). It seems that the bars in Italy are run and staffed by males as I haven’t seen many female staff yet.


The first visit – a small feast

I wanted to be stealth-like on my first visit to Parenti as I didn’t know how long the Citizenship paperwork and interview would take.

As the gentleman at the Commune that took my documents lives near to my relatives, he insisted in driving us to their house – he had mentioned we were coming and they were already expecting us. I remember from my childhood years that the custom is to come bearing gifts and as I had nothing, I was quite embarrassed.

After several hours of drinking homemade Grappa (my cheeky 70-year old relative trying to get me drunk), eating homemade Calabrese sausage (just like my parents used to make), wonderful home-grown baked garlic potatoes, and much talking, it was time to catch the last bus out of Parenti. Time passed so quickly during this first gathering.

Promising to return and stay for a couple of nights, we waited for the bus with my relative, which incidentally came about half an hour late. During which time, more of my cousins came out of the woodwork (word had got around) and coming up to us, hugging, and chatting whilst waiting. It was like meeting long-lost relatives – very sweet.

There does not seem to be many young people here and mostly retirees so think we were a novelty, although we’re not really that young!

Not much to do in this village either but it is on the way to the Sila National park, which is supposed to be very beautiful, so will definitely have to return. It was a lovely long lunch and afternoon.

In true Italian style, it is all about enjoying food, company, and taking one’s time over very lengthy delicious lunches.

The southern Italians are very warm and hospitable. You are greeted as if you’ve know them all your life even though it’s the first meeting. My cousin left me with this: “the blood is the same regardless of where you were born; it’s still under the skin and never changes” – I think this is the interpretation as my Calabrese dialect is pretty rusty.

I happened to mention I had to bring potatoes from Parenti but also locally made Provola Siciliana (cheese) for our friends in Cosenza. Apparently, this type of cheese from here is supposed to be the best. So, my cousin insisted on giving us about 5 kilos of his home-grown potatoes: “the ones in the shops are from Naples at the moment and not good”. Then he kindly showed us to the local Delicatessen for the special cheese.

Weighted down with potatoes and cheese, we waited at the bus stop…not really a bus stop but a spot on the pavement. The bus picks you up from anywhere along the main street.

Everyone seems to come out after 17:00 hrs, stand on the street, and just chat…guess there isn’t much else to do here.

slogan, Parenti, Italy, Calabria, Italy

“All Coppers Are Bastards” – anti-police acronym (think this is the meaning of this stencil?)

Back to Cosenza

Finally taking the very late bus back and arriving in Cosenza at the Autostationze, strolled down Corso Mazinni.

It was as if we were in another city. A sea of heads mingled back and forth, up and down the mall. Fashionably dressed locals promenading the pedestrian mall during this warm evening.

The last time we visited this mall was in the afternoon when everything was shut. A fired cannon ball would not have founds it’s mark – it really was that empty. Now, it was the complete opposite almost as if we’d got off at the wrong city!

A different and vibrant feel, much more alive. Now I understand why there are loads of shops in this mall.

With a population of about 100,000 but an urban area of over 268,000 inhabitants, it is now clear. Everyone sleeps during the heat of the day, then parties late afternoon and into the night, or until the shops close at 20:00 hrs.


The second visit – a huge feast

As I need to fly back to Australia early September to apply for a 12-month Residency Visa but also organise the repair of a badly leaking roof, decided to visit my relatives in Parenti again.

This time my relatives had a few days’ notice. I should have known from my childhood years what sort of afternoon would unfold.

One of chatting around the table for hours whilst eating a feast of various courses: pasta, oven-baked rabbit, bean and garlic salad, a selection of delicious cheeses, scented tomato salad, garlic potato and pepper salad, home made wine, homemade Limoncello (liqueur), gelato; and the food just kept coming out, in true Italian style. Then a massive home-baked special traditional chocolate torte arrived and we were given a quarter to take home and eat for breakfast! I’m listing all these dishes as I was amazed of how much food kept coming out…and how much we ate.

All home-grown in Parenti and home-made with simple fresh ingredients – lunch was absolutely scrumptious. I must return for cooking lessons to learn how to cook traditional Calabrese feasts.

Parenti also has a smallish Old Town, which we walked up the steep cobbled hill and steps after lunch but as time ran out, we didn’t explore too much.

The countryside seems much greener this time and the mountains are gorgeous. The air is a little fresher and crisper. This is such a beautiful region and can see why my father always longed to return here…sadly, he never made it back to Italy.

Reflections

The hospitality here is kind and overwhelming but also humbling. People are so very friendly.

Locals that we meet are happy to discuss politics, travel, and anything else on the agenda.

All are passionate about their country and love it for its beauty and history but say the politicians are destroying Italy. Same world over I guess, and it is up to the people to change the country as politicians won’t be doing this in any hurry.

For now, it’s back to Cosenza again to get ready to leave Italy.

Visit my Nilla’s Photography Galleries for more global images. More posts on Italy.

train, Rogliano, Calabria, Italy

Waiting…

10 thoughts on “Land of my Father: Parenti, Southern Italy

  1. My grandfather was born in Parenti…and my grandmother. I want to go, I communicate on Facebook with relatives there….I would love to become a citizen of Italy…my mother was born in Matera, Italy…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad you enjoyed this post!
      Not sure if you saw the Translate Page button (top-right of each post) that translates the post for you – it’s not perfect but, not too bad.
      I first visited Parenti in 1985 then again last year, and can honestly say, the town has hardly changed in over 30 years.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Eine ganz tolle Geschichte! Herrlich beschrieben. Ich war mit dem Fahrrad an der Küste bis Sizilien. Es hat mir so gut gefallen, dass ich wiederkommen werde. Mit Fahrrad. Grüße aus den Alpen.
    A great story! Beautifully described. I was cycling on the coast to Sicily. I liked it so much that I would return. With bicycle. Greetings from the Alps.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Danke!
      I’m glad you liked my post and thank you for taking the time to comment – much appreciated.
      I hope to visit Sicily soon, I’ve heard many great stories about Sicily’s beauty so very much looking forward to this trip – just have to organise it… 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Very grateful for your input Francis!

      It was a very funny scene…yes, a Fellini movie but I just need to embellish the scene more 🙂

      Loads of very friendly people here, which is great, especially for newcomers.

      Liked by 1 person

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