4 Brilliant Days – Cornwall Camping

Time for a spot of camping in brilliant Cornwall. It’s easy to fall in love with Cornwall. I did this on my first visit to Cornwall in 1985.

Cornwall

Cornwall’s ancient Celtic kingdom and language date back to pre-Roman times – its deep-seated history chiselled in the coastline’s craggy cliffs and boundless miles of breathtaking beaches.

The county’s magnetic pull sees travel through England’s stunning south-west county on many occasions. And for me, Cornwall always feels as if its independence is at the forefront of the minds of Cornish people.

Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

The elderly or original locals of Cornwall have their own language – Kernewek. Based on the Celtic language, Kernewek started seeing a revival during the 20th-century after its extinction as Cornwall’s first language in the 18th-century. The Cornish accent is what I love most as it reminds me of a pirate’s accent.

Sparse tin mines still dot the impressive Cornish coast and becoming even more popular due to the British historical drama series: Poldark.

Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006, it’s comforting to know that Cornwall’s historic mining landscapes are protected for future generations.

Check my previous post on Cornwall whilst travelling in Reg (motorhome).

Bude

The camping base is in the gorgeous seaside town of Bude, which is wonderful for surrounding dramatic coastal and beach walks – my previous post on Bude includes for more activities.

Why not enjoy the endless striking coastline with a long walk or hike?

Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Take a wander along the South West Coast Path from Bude to the coastal village of Crackington Haven on a hike of almost 16 kilometres. At the start of this walk, you bump into several memorials and monuments overlooking the wild Atlantic Ocean.

This particular monument close to the cricket pitch is in memory for the hospitality that Bude gave to Clifton college (originally in Bristol, Somerset) following the college’s bombing during WWII.

coastal walk, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Left-over timeworn relics are embedded in the hills, such as this pillbox at Crooklets Beach used in WWII by the US 2nd Rangers for practice in readiness for the D-Day Landings.

The experience of driving through Normandy in 2016 to visit the infamous D-Day Landing beaches also helps to reflect on this tumultuous history during this coastal walk.

pillbox, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

The English coastline is scattered with WWII reminders as is Dorset – some 28,000 coastal and inland pillboxes of which only around 6,500 still remain.

coastal walk, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Ambling further along this beautiful coastal path and only reaching Maer Cliff, decide to turn back for the long 5-kilometre walk to the campsite.

coastal walk, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Marvellous panoramic seascapes along this expansive coast are ever-present.

coastal walk, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
A Bude glimpse along the demanding coastal path back to the campsite.

coastal walk, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Built perhaps as a refuge for coast guards back in 1835, Compass Point Tower offers a temporary sanctuary should the weather worsen.

Compass Point Tower, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

And, is a great spot for photographing up and down this savage rugged coast.

coastal walk, Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Photo credit: Neil Lintern

Café Limelight – Bude Castle

When in town, a visit to Bude Castle is a must but make time to stop for a scrumptious Cornish Tea – still the cheapest and best in town at £5.50 – served with thick artery-hardening clotted Cornish cream.

Today’s lunchtime indulgent consists of a delicate homemade crusty quiche with a side of coleslaw and a fresh crisp salad. The chicken sandwich is also delicious – prices are reasonable.

Cafe Limelight, Bude Castle, coastal walk, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe


Padstow

Exuding wonderfully warm-baked homely aromas that beckon, a visit to Padstow is not complete without indulging in a famous traditional delectable Cornish Pasty.

Just off the waterfront serves the best pasty in Padstow in the small but very busy family-run Chough Bakery, which has been operating for almost 30 years.

Once the pasty hits your stomach, it’s time to amble along the pretty streets…

Padstow, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

St Petroc Church

Dating back to 1425-1450, St Petroc church’s cream stone used for the columns arrived by sea from Caen in Normandy. The Dolerite (dark grey stone) used in the church was quarried at Cataclews Point.

St Petroc Church, Padstow, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Back in town, even tired seagulls need a safe haven to rest…

seagull, Padstow, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Padstow’s picturesque harbour is popular with tourists – on every visit so far it’s busy, especially during summer.

Padstow, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Strolling west from Padstow along the walking path, a panoramic uninterrupted vista of The Rock – small village opposite Padstow – comes into view.

The Rock, Padstow, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Acclaimed as one of Cornwall’s major water sports centres, sailing, windsurfing, water skiing, and canoeing are offered weather permitting.

Take a ferry from Padstow’s harbour across to The Rock and laze on the long stretches of fine sandy beaches – a result of the estuary’s tidal waters.


Boscastle

Another of my favourite Cornish destinations is the quaint fishing village of Boscastle.

Visiting over several decades, Boscastle seems much busier with tourists today than I previously remember.

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Dating back to the 12th-century, many of the medieval buildings have been restored.

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Boscastle’s 2004 destructive flash flood saw extensive damage. Tragically, 100 homes were destroyed and 6 washed into the sea.

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Today, Boscastle’s peaceful setting doesn’t offer much evidence of the 2004 fierce destruction.

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
First visiting the Museum of Witchcraft and Magic in 1985, I’m happy to see this non-profit museum still operating. Offering a ton of history and exploring ‘British magical practice’, the museum is worth a visit.

Museum of Witchcraft and Magic, Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
On this unusually hot English day after indulging in a must-have super-rich, Cornish clotted cream ice-cream, decide on a coastal walk heading out of Boscastle along the SW Coastal Path’s aged jagged cliffs.

Boscastle’s natural harbour is further protected by 2 stone walls built in 1584, which provide a safe shelter for fishing and private boats.

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
The views are nothing short of spectacular…

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

…with the village of Boscastle quietly nestled in a fluorescent-green undulating valley.

Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
The unique Harbour Light Tea Garden is popular with tourists and serves deliciously light lunches, ‘locally grown loose leaf tea and hand-roasted coffee’.

The Harbour Light Tea Garden, Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

The distinctive Wellington Hotel provides real ale beer, an ‘award-winning restaurant’, and comfortable accommodation steeped in history.

Wellington Hotel, Boscastle, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Dating back to the 16th-century, past guests include members of the Royal Family. Thomas Hardy – English novelist – fell in love with Boscastle and also stayed at the Wellington.


Getting there

Bude, Boscastle, Padstow, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, EuropeFrom Street in Somerset, it’s a good 2-hour drive depending on traffic, until you reach Bude.

Driving along the southwest coast, tiny charming villages are never too far away from each other so days trips are easy to Boscastle and Padstow.

On the way back along the coast, why not stop at the captivating village of Clovelly?


Camping in Bude

The last time at the Upper Lynstone Caravan & Camping Park was in Reg the trusty motorhome. Sadly, Reg is no more and found a new home in 2017.

The cost of a pitch at the tranquil campsite excluding power is £23 per night. Great clean facilities are provided.

Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Practice a couple of weeks ago at the Glastonbury Festival makes pitching the 4-man tent much easier today.

Bude, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Photo credit: Neil Lintern

Could easily stay at this site for a week or more but time is hurrying on…

Visit Nilla’s Photography for more images. More posts on the United Kingdom at Image Earth Travel.

28 thoughts on “4 Brilliant Days – Cornwall Camping

Add yours

    1. They definitely are great destinations.

      The Cornish coastline captivated me years ago when I first visited in 1985 and I did indeed spend hours just sitting and watching the ocean from these high craggy cliffs. Back then, I also met some wonderful locals that made for a wonderful travelling experience, especially as a solo-traveller.

      Like

    1. Hey Lisa, thank you for the lovely feedback.
      I’ve never sailed in the UK.The closest I’ve got on the water was taking a ferry from Cornwall to the Scilly Isles back in 1985, does that count? 😉
      All going well here and hope you guys are enjoying yourselves.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. its beautiful there. I’ve been to Devon but not Cornwall. My brother and his girlfriend go all the time and they love it there. It could be anywhere abroad x

      Liked by 2 people

  1. Thank you for sharing this, one of my favourite place in the UK. The clotted cream is a dream none like it anywhere. I love the scenery and the sea. The country just fills me with awe along with Devon but Cornwall has that extra special feel to it. So many quaint buildings pleased to see they are being restored. Tintagel was a favourite of mine too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the great feedback and your thoughts.
      I visited Tintagel in 1985 and again in 2009, but missed it on the last few visits and yes, it’s a gorgeous village and the scenery along this part of England is stunning (when it’s not raining!).

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Mohamad,
      Many thanks for your feedback and continual support, as always. You’re not late as I published this post only an hour ago. 😉
      I only write about places that I’ve travelled to and haven’t been to the Henan Province (yet), but did spend 12 days in and around Beijing. I will try to publish 2 posts on China in January as I have most of December posts already written and scheduled.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I’m not an expert and don’t know a lot but try to understand something.
      We do have many Asians especially Chinese in Australia, which is very multicultural and as we’re so close – China is our biggest trading partner I believe.
      I’ve done a lot of Travelling over the years and some volunteer work in SE Asia but too much in China yet…

      Liked by 1 person

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